Unleavened Bread

"And you shall observe the Feast of Unleavened Bread, for on this very day I brought your hosts out of the land of Egypt [see Rock Of Ages]: therefore you shall observe this day, throughout your generations, as an ordinance for ever. In the first month [see Bible Months], on the fourteenth day of the month at evening, you shall eat unleavened bread, and so until the twenty-first day of the month at evening. For seven days no leaven shall be found in your houses; for if any one eats what is leavened, that person shall be cut off from the congregation of Israel, whether he is a sojourner or a native of the land." (Exodus 12:17-19 RSV)

The Passover marks the beginning of the Days of Unleavened Bread. What was the purpose of the seven-day observance?

What relevance do the Days of Unleavened Bread have to Christians? The Feast of Unleavened bread memorialized Israel's deliverance from a life of slavery under Pharaoh after the slaying of the Passover lamb, but it also now represents the Christian's deliverance from a life of sin under Satan after the slaying of Jesus Christ, the "Lamb of God."

There was, and is, nothing wrong with eating things containing yeast at other times, but for the purpose of the Days of Unleavened Bread it was used as an symbol of sin. It was also sometimes used as a metaphor for sinful pride and hypocrisy:

God does nothing in vain. All of the Old Testament observances have Christian applications - that was their entire purpose, to preview what was to come in due time.

The Dual Meaning Of The God-Commanded Biblical Holy Days

The spring Holy Days symbolize the events related to the First Coming of Jesus Christ:

The autumn Holy Days symbolize the events related to the Second Coming of Jesus Christ:

Fact Finder: Did the early Christian church continue to observe the Feast of Unleavened Bread?
Acts 20:6 and 1 Corinthians 5:7-8

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