Byblos

Byblos was the Greek-language name (used by both Greeks and Romans - see Ancient Empires - Greece and Ancient Empires - Rome) for Gebal, an ancient seaport in Lebanon (see also Phoenicia). It was a major manufacturer and exporter of papyrus, a tall reed-like plant that grows in swamps and along rivers, that was used to make writing material - and hence, books. The English word Bible is derived from Byblos, meaning "the papyrus," or "the book."

The Hebrew Scriptures, or Old Testament

The Old Testament is composed of 39 books - 17 historical, 5 poetic, 17 prophetic. Their order, relative size, and authors are:

Historical (47% of the Old Testament)

Poetic (22% of the Old Testament)

Prophetic (31% of the Old Testament)

The New Testament

The New Testament is composed of the 4 Gospels, the Book of Acts, 21 Epistles (letters), and the Book of Revelation. Their order, relative size, and authors are:

The 4 Gospels (43% of the New Testament)

The Book of Acts (12% of the New Testament)

The 21 Epistles (38% of the New Testament)

The Book of Revelation (7% of the New Testament)

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